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Welcome to the

EPIDEMIOLOGY RESEARCH GROUP

@ University of Edinburgh

Our research interests concern the dynamics of infections of animals and humans at different scales, from the interaction of a parasite or virus with host cells through to global estimates of disease burden. This research involves the close integration of field studies, laboratory experiments and theoretical analyses and draws on collaborations between epidemiologists, mathematical biologists, geneticists, molecular biologists, immunologists and others. We work on a variety of infectious disease systems ranging from prion diseases to viruses, bacteria, protozoa and helminths. The common theme is the development of a formal, quantitative understanding of the dynamics of parasites and pathogens within hosts and host populations with particular emphasis on informing the design of disease control programmes.

The Epigroup is located in the Ashworth Laboratories at the University of Edinburgh's Kings Buildings site and is part of the Centre for Immunity, Infection and Evolution and the Usher Institute of Population Health Sciences and Informatics.

Job opportunity

There is a postdoctoral research associate opportunity available. The aim of this position is to develop models of molecular evolution for RNA viruses and develop efficient analysis algorithms to undertake research on large scale phylodynamics data sets of viruses. You can find more details here.

We have PhD studentship opportunities available

- 2 EASTBIO PhD Studentships

- Coinfection dynamics in African children (Ker Memorial PhD studentship).

PhD studentships available from the Darwin Trust on any topic related to our current research themes in antimicrobial resistance and emerging viruses (please contact kath.tracey@ed.ac.uk).

- PhD studentships available through the Wellcome Trust PhD programme in Hosts, Pathogens and Global Health (http://www.eid.ed.ac.uk/wt-hpgh)


 

 

Verocytotoxogenic E coli O157

 

GIS analysis of farm demography influence on FMD in virus transmission UK densities of sheep

 

 

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